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Reformation, Revolution and Crisis in European History, Culture and Political Thought - USyd - 29 Nov - 1 Dec

sydney-uni'Reformation, Revolution and Crisis in European History, Culture and Political Thought'

International Conference, the University of Sydney,
29 November to 1 December 2017

Confirmed speakers to date:

  • Professor Lyndal Roper, Oriel College, Oxford
  • Emeritus Professor Graeme Gill, FASSA, Dept of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney


Today Europe stands at a crossroads unlike any it has faced before. Yet this is far from the first period of crisis Europe has faced. To understand Europe today, we must grasp its history, and the history of the ideas that have shaped it, as a history of crisis.

In 2017, we will commemorate three critical landmarks in European history: the Protestant Reformation (1517), the Russian Revolution (1917), and the signature of the Treaty of Rome (1957), which marked a different kind of ‘reformation’ (re-formation). Other anniversaries marked in 2017 include that of the 1947 Truman doctrine which ‘officially’ started the Cold War, that of the start of the Greek junta, and that of the 1937 bombing of Guernica, made famous by Picasso’s painting, and which marked a key point in the internationalisation of the Spanish Civil War. 2017 even marks the centenary of an (anti )artistic ‘revolution’ of sorts: Marcel Duchamp’s work Fontaine, which shocked the international art world and met with immediate censorship. We will also be looking forward to 2018, which marks the anniversary of another series of European historical landmarks: the ‘Spring of the Peoples’ in 1848; May ’68 and the Prague Spring of 1968; even the Munich agreement of 1938 which set off a processthat led to the largest ‘crisis’ in modern European history: World War II.

We will also be looking forward to 2018, which marks the anniversary of another series of European historical landmarks: the ‘Spring of the Peoples’ in 1848; May ’68 and the Prague Spring of 1968; even the Munich agreement of 1938 which set off a process that led to the largest ‘crisis’ in modern European history: World War II.

This conference examines these and related historical landmarks and their echoes in the present. It brings together scholars working in European Studies, broadly understood.

We encourage contributions from a range of perspectives, including social, political, intellectual and cultural history; social and cultural geography; and social and political science.

Please send an abstract of 250 words, together with a short biography (name, affiliation, research specialisation), to Cat Moir (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and Bronwyn Winter (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) by 30 June 2017.

Please note that we are unable to offer scholarships for travel.

Note: Most of the events listed on the ASCP website are not hosted by the ASCP.  Events posted here are considered to be of interest to the Australasian continental philosophy community.

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